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Pug

Pug / A Wonderful Breed

 The Pug is incredibly people-orientated and thrive in social situations. They love nothing more than spending quality time with their human families, making them great pets for those who live busy or sedentary lifestyles. Their loyalty and affectionate nature makes them a perfect playmate for children, while their even temperaments make them ideal companions for seniors.

These loyal dogs are also incredibly smart, and can be easily trained if given the right motivation — which often comes in the form of treats! With patience and consistency, pugs can learn a wide range of skills, from basic commands to more complex tricks.

Another great thing about pugs is their adaptability. These low-maintenance dogs are happy to live in apartments, houses, or anywhere else they can get plenty of love and attention from their owners. They’re also incredibly easy to groom — a weekly brushing should suffice for most of the year!

 

Pugs are certainly a breed to be celebrated. With their unique personality and loyal nature, it’s no wonder they have been beloved by people from all walks of life throughout the centuries. Whether you’re looking for an active running companion, a faithful friend or a funny clown; pugs make ideal companions for everyone.

Pug Traits:

  • Body Weight: 14-18 pounds (females); 16-20 pounds (males)

  • Body Height: 10-14 inches 

 

  • Body Type: The Pug is a small, sturdy, barrel shaped dog with relatively short legs. He is known for his wide chest and his flattened face placing the Pug in the brachycephalic group of dogs.  They have small ears that are covered in fine, thin hairs (compared to velvet) and are folded over reaching eye level (rose or button shaped).  Their eyes are large, round and dark. This breed is also known for their wrinkles that are very abundant and deep on their face and foreheads. One unique and special feature of the Pug is their tail. Pug tails naturally have a curl. The tail may have one loop or two (a double loop is highly desired in the show ring). 

  • Lifespan: Between 12-15years

  • Coat type: Short

  • Colours: Fawn, Silver Fawn, Black

  • Health: Pugs are generally healthy if properly cared for and not allowed to get obese, but like any dog they do have issues they are more prone to, most common are Brachycephalic Syndrome, and eye issues.

Pug Personality:

  • Eager to Please: Pugs were bred for one purpose, to be human companions, so it is no surprise that they are incredibly loyal pets who will always be by your side. They form an incredibly close bond with their humans, and are not a dog that believes in personal space, so prepare to have a shadow with you wherever you go.

  • Gentle Disposition: Pugs are truly among the sweetest and gentlest dog breeds. This attitude is perfectly embodied in their charming, and sometimes goofy personality.

  • Friendly: While Pugs may have a bit of a stubborn streak, they’re not

       aggressive in any way. Most Pugs are suited for life with both small

       children and other dogs and they are known to be on of the best

       pets for children due to their gentle nature and patient disposition.

  • Energy Needs:  As Pugs were bred for a life of leisure, they are not the

       most athletic dogs. They are the ideal pet for households that do not 

      wish the challenge of high-energy animals. Naturally, they need regular

      walks and love to play, but they don't require quite as much commitment as more active breeds. In fact, you           might see them lounging all day long.

  • Trainability: Pugs, despite contrary belief, are incredibly smart, and can be easily trained if given the right motivation — which often comes in the form of treats! They are generally quite attentive, and respond almost immediately to positive training techniques. They are very food motivated and love learning new tricks because it means more time with you.

The Pug is incredibly people-orientated and thrive in social situations. They love nothing more than spending quality time with their human families, making them great pets for those who live busy or sedentary lifestyles. Their loyalty and affectionate nature makes them a perfect playmate for children, while their even temperaments make them ideal companions for seniors.  If you are looking for a companion dog that is small in size, big in attitude and low maintenance then a pug might just be your perfect fit!

These loyal dogs are also incredibly smart, and can be easily trained if given the right motivation — which often comes in the form of treats! With patience and consistency, pugs can learn a wide range of skills, from basic commands to more complex tricks.

 

Another great thing about pugs is their adaptability. These low-maintenance dogs are happy to live in apartments, houses, or anywhere else they can get plenty of love and attention from their owners. They’re also incredibly easy to groom — a weekly brushing should suffice for most of the year!

 

Pugs are certainly a breed to be celebrated. With their unique personality and loyal nature, it’s no wonder they have been beloved by people from all walks of life throughout the centuries. Whether you’re looking for an active running companion, a faithful friend or a funny clown; pugs make ideal companions for everyone.

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Pug Breed History

Some breeds of dogs have seen their purpose change over the years. The Pug is not among them. These cheerful, playful, and affectionate little dogs are among the oldest dog breeds known today, and throughout their long history they have performed just one very important job: keeping us company.

The Ultimate Companion

Pugs are an ancient breed of dog, with roots dating back to 400 B.C. Most historians agree that the breed originated in China, where they were bred as companion animals for the wealthy. This does not come as a surprise to Pug enthusiasts, and they will be the first to tell you that Pugs sure know how to make their owners feel like royalty.

With their people-pleasing nature and adaptability, Pugs made a name for themselves as ideal lapdogs and companions. They kept Tibetan Buddhist monks company in their monasteries and received royal treatment as companions to Chinese emperors and their families, who valued them so much they even kept guards and servants to protect and care for them.

Three types of flat-faced dogs were bred by the Chinese: The Lion dog, the Pekingese, and the “Lo-sze,” also known as the ancient Pug.

Miss Neish, member of the Ladies Kennel Club of England, 1898

What About Those Wrinkles?

Pugs have wrinkled faces because Chinese breeders purposely bred them that way. They actually aimed to create a pattern of wrinkles on the dogs’ foreheads, which resembled the Chinese character for “prince” (王).

The most popular theory about the breed’s name is that it came from marmoset monkeys, which were also known as Pug monkeys. Marmosets were popular pets in the early 1700s, and their faces look very similar to the faces of Pug dogs. Other theories suggest that Pug is based on the Latin word “pugnus,” meaning “fist.”

Pug Mania

The Pug’s popularity spread from China to Japan and Russia and ultimately to Europe, where they quickly ensconced themselves in royal palaces and the homes of the upper class. Their small size, sturdy frame, and minimal exercise requirements made them ideally suited as a household pet.

The aunt of Catherine the Great of Russia even took some of her Pugs to church with her, proving just how adaptable Pugs are to any circumstance.

Numerous monarchs kept them by their sides, including Queen Victoria of England and Prince William the Silent of Holland, who owed his life to his brave little Pug. In tribute to the Pug’s lofty social position, even renowned European artists such as Goya, William Hogarth, and Reinagle included them in their paintings.

After the Catholic Church forbid Catholics from becoming Freemasons, a group of Catholics decided to form a covert Freemason society called the Order of the Pug in 1740. They chose the Pug as their symbol because Pugs are loyal and trustworthy. To be initiated into the order, you had to wear a dog collar and scratch at the door.

From the countryside to the city, Pugs kept their owners company, warming hearts and laps alike.

Today’s Pug

Pugs have been the dogs of choice for royals, historical figures, and modern-day celebrities. Queen Victoria loved Pugs. Harriet Beecher Stowe, author of Uncle Tom’s Cabin, had two pugs named Punch and Missy. Heavy metal singer Rob Zombie has a pug named Dracula, and famous Italian designer Valentino had a pug named Oliver, after which he named one of his clothing lines. Other Pug-owning celebrities include Gerard Butler, Jessica Alba, Hugh Laurie, Tori Spelling, and Paris Hilton.

Today, the Pug continues to delight and entertain owners around the world. While the exact origins of the breed remain a mystery, one thing is certain: Pugs still perform the job they were bred for with the charm and loyalty only a Pug possesses.

Breed History content credited to:

American Kennel Club

Pug Grooming Needs

  1. Bathe once every 3-4 weeks

  2. Cleaning the wrinkles daily

  3. Brushing the coat every 1 to 3 days

  4. Cleaning the eye area daily

  5. Cleaning the ears; the ear flaps several times per week, the ear canals every 6 weeks

  6. Paw care every 2 weeks

  7. Nose care, as needed but usually every 1 to 3 weeks in the wintertime

  8. Trimming the nails every 6 weeks

Pug Exercise Needs

To keep your Pug healthy and happy, aim for two 20-minute exercise sessions per day. However, make sure to incorporate light or moderate cardio that increases their heart rate slightly and keeps their body moving. This can include walking, faster walking, fetching, or playing. Some Pugs may be able to handle longer walks or hikes, but always bring a doggy backpack for rest breaks. Swimming can also be an option, but be sure to keep it to short bursts with plenty of rest between. 

If you have a Pug puppy under 10 months old, avoid excessive exercise that could cause damage to their growing limbs. And be sure to wait at least an hour after eating before exercising to prevent bloat. If your Pug begins to breathe heavily, stop the exercise immediately, as their breathing system may be narrow and limit their ability to handle vigorous activity. And avoid heavy or moderate exercise in high temperatures to prevent heat stress or heat stroke. 

While you can't guarantee a perfectly healthy Pug, you can help maintain their health and weight with a little effort and care. Just remember to respect your Pug's limits and give them the exercise they need without pushing them too hard.

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